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Small Business Nation. A Project of The U.S. Chamber of Commerce

I don't know my Congressman. How can I set up a meeting with him/her?

Please note: When meeting with your elected official in Washington, D.C., or in their local district office, it is best to request the appointment four to six weeks in advance.

Step 1: Find out who represents you in Congress.

Visit http://www.congress.org/ -- Use the “Get Involved” widget at the right to enter your zip code. This will provide you with the name and contact information for your two Senators and one Representative.

Step 2: Get their contact information.

Click on the name of each Senator and your Representative. Click on the “contact” tab and note the Washington, D.C. office location, the office phone number and office fax number. Click on the “staff” tab and note the name of the scheduler.

Step 3: Draft your request letters.

Send a separate letter to each Senator and your Representative requesting an in-person meeting on your desired date. Sample letters can be found here.

Step 4: Fax your letters.

Fax (do NOT mail or email) the appropriate letter to the attention of the scheduler for each Senator and your Representative.

Step 5: Follow-up with a phone call.

One to two days after faxing your letter, call the main number of the Washington, D.C. office of each Senator and your Representative to follow-up on your meeting request. Ask to speak with the scheduler (who should have received your letter via fax). If your Senator or Representative can meet with you, confirm the exact time and location of the meeting. If your Senator or Representative is unable to meet with you, tell the scheduler you would like to meet with whichever staff person handles the issue you’d like to discuss.

Step 6: Confirm your meeting(s).

Before leaving for Washington, D.C., call the scheduler (or the individual staffer with whom you will meet) to once again confirm the exact time and location of your meeting.
When meeting with your elected official in Washington, D.C. or in their local district office, it is best to request the appointment four to six weeks in advance.

  • Get prepared by finding out what to expect during your time on the Hill.
  • In your meeting, be sure to share your personal story. Let Congress know which issues are having an impact on your bottom line.

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